Events
Our participation with the WHO in their informal consultation of people living with non-communicable diseases and mental health conditions

Our participation with the WHO in their informal consultation of people living with non-communicable diseases and mental health conditions

Our participation with the WHO in their informal consultation of people living with non-communicable diseases and mental health conditions

Ever since its conceptualization, Napata College has made it abundantly clear that it seeks to transform and modernize medical education in both the Sudan and the world.

In an effort to see to it that this conceptualization is made manifest, the college has adopted addressing the ever-growing threat that is non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and Mental Health conditions (MHCs) which unfortunately are poorly understood and almost never taught, especially the latter.

In February of 2022, the college received an invitation to participate in a meeting held by the WHO which was perfectly timed, and Napata College has always encouraged constant participation, and has encouraged in particular its students to participate in this consultation because NCDs and refugees’ health needs are emphasized in our MBBS curriculum.

Dr Rudaina I. Osman, a Napata College graduate, and a current member of staff represented Napata College at the meeting.

Below is her report of the meeting:

The meeting took place on the 21st and 22nd of February, Day 1 focused on People Living with Non-Communicable diseases whereas Day 2 focused on people living with Mental Health Conditions.

The meeting concentrated on the importance of people to share their inspiring stories, the importance of acceptance among the community, and creating a judgment-free environment to ensure a community with a positive mind-set.

It also focused on what we can possibly do to ensure better lives to these individuals.

I presented myself and my group where in Day 1 I stated the importance of engaging Families of the patient, community as a whole including religious leaders to spread awareness, leaderships, exercise, nutritionists, and people with financial struggles as well as the importance of implementing this by including support groups and guidelines that include the people with these conditions as well as financial support as this is a burden in developing countries and importance of engaging with patients upon diagnosis and by adequate follow-ups.

I also participated in Day 2 which focused on people living with mental health conditions and my group and I discussed points like who is not in the room and how to include them, in which I presented my group and stated that refugees, people at war, children, and countries with lower socio-economic statuses have not been included, and the importance of including religious leaders to ensure proper education in regards to these conditions and stakeholders to reduce the stigma.

 

 

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